“Roses in a Crystal Vase” oil on linen, 36″ x 36″ $5500.

Inquiries:  telephone: 514-935-9286;   email:  roxanne@roxannedyer.com

Details of “Roses in a Crystal Vase” 

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 1)

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 2)

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 3)

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 4)

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 5)

“Roses in a Vase” (detail 6)

About the painting:

I painted this original artwork, “Roses in a Crystal Vase” on linen and mounted it on a 36″ x 36″ gallery support, 1.75″ in depth.  First of all, Cadmium Red & Yellow Deep, a gorgeous Red Violet and Quinacridone Rose were incorporated with my basic palette.  In addition I applied the pigments using a slightly abstract, rather than realistic, technique.  This was because I think abstracted artwork leaves plenty to the imagination.

Especially relevant, my objective:

… was to create a soft but dramatic image.  Therefore, I positioned the bouquet in a window.  Here, light would filter through the petals, define edges and reflect the blueness of the natural daylight.  A wide band of ultramarine (tint with titanium white) articulated the windowsill.  Furthermore, dabs of the hue layered and scumbled throughout the canvas created a sense of reflected light.

While first underpainting with yellow ochre, I created a base upon which violet, red, rose and ultramarine hues could be layer to a subtle incandescence.  Cadmium yellow (deep hue) was generously swept through shapes.  Also, the brilliant colour created the illusion of sunlight as well as greens when layered over the ultramarine.  Another point, I mixed some pigments on the palette and others on the canvas while working wet in wet because I like variety.  Otherwise, I’d probably get board.My background became softer as I laid in white paint over juicy bits of mid-tone underpainting.  As a result the bouquet appeared to move forward.  

I diffused edges or masked where necessary with a translucent veil in order to direct the eye toward focal points in the artwork.  Consequently an implied movement was created within the boarders of the artwork.  This movement was intended to guide the eye gently through the artwork like consecutive pages in a book lead through a story.In conclusion I found the process was delightful, consequently as a painter and from a personal perspective.  If you enjoy the results or have any questions, leave a comment at the bottom of the page or write to me at: 

roxanne@roxannedyer.com

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By |2018-06-05T00:07:11+00:00November 30th, 2017|Blog, New Artwork|Comments Off on “Roses in a Crystal Vase”

About the Author:

Capturing light to render it’s effects is one reason Roxanne loves to create art. Preferred subjects for her oil paintings are the human form, florals in their environment, still life including teacups and satin bows, skyscapes and hot air balloons. Her current focus is the figure in portrait painted with a view to expressing emotion by capturing light and rendering it’s effects. With a painting career spanning 20 years, Roxanne completed her Fine Arts degree at Concordia University in 1998.  An exhibitor in numerous group and solo exhibitions, Roxanne’s original artwork has won several awards, hangs in collections internationally and has been published in InternationalArtist.com Magazine. A finalists in the 2008 fine art competition Roxanne’s painting L’Habilleuse was featured in the November 2009 issue of The Artist’s Magazine’s Competition Spotlight. Roxanne is currently developing a body of work for exhibition in 2019. Spring 2018 she attended an art workshop given by David A. Leffel, Sherrie McGraw and Jacqueline Kaman of The Artists Guild in Santa Fe. Roxanne traveled to Italy in 2013 to attend artist David Jon Kassan’s workshop at the JSS in Civita Castellana.